Talking and singing 

Here’s a thing: I usually talk quietly, but I often sing loudly…

Maybe it’s because a song has “known” words, they’re (usually) already written, and there’s a melody to go with them. The music helps a lot in this area.

Talking with friends the other day about songs I love, I said it’s usually the feeling I get from it – rather than the lyrics in a song – that attract me to it. Maybe I’ll think about the lyrics afterwards, but typically they’re not the initial pull for me…

Though as soon as I write that, it occurs to me: sometimes the lyrics of a song really do hit home, and the melody doesn’t even matter. When they tell a story, or put across a point that gets me right there, it feels like the music is a delivery mechanism for lyrical poetry.

Isn’t it great that music can include both?! Words and melodies coming together… that’s before we even get to harmony, rhythm, modulation, dynamics or anything else.

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about music with words, sometimes music can provide a subtle backdrop to a story, guiding in ways that are intuitive or pre-verbal. With its emotional connection, music can sometimes reach parts that words alone can’t.

So I’ll keep singing :)

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Music Therapy: Evidence & Proof

Back in 2013 Kim Ross wrote: “Why we shouldn’t try to prove that music therapy works” – this article has rung a few bells for me recently, particularly after digesting a range of music therapy research articles…

There appears to be a difference between seeking proof and gathering evidence. Working in an evidence-based way, one gathers research results, trials, experience and puts them into practice. Shifting focus to clients instead of critics can reframe research, as Kim says:

“The profession exists to help clients, and we must keep our clients’ wellbeing as the central focus and reason for our research”.

“Let’s not be afraid of research, or of people posing questions about music therapy and how it works.”

So, onwards with research, investigating and finding out more… starting with the BAMT UK music therapy conference this weekend organised entitled “Re-Visioning our Voice: Resourcing music therapy for contemporary needs”.