Books books books

Here’s a few of the books I’ve been reading: some are specifically about music therapy, others are about related subjects. They’re listed in the order I came to them – and many more will join the list, perhaps in a future post…

 

Music Therapy: Intimate Notes – Pavlicevic
This was recommended to me when I first began looking into music therapy, and provides a lot of insight – get a copy if you’re at all interested in the subject!

Key Concepts in Psychoanalysis – Frosch
A run-down of many topics in this area, eg: unconscious, transference, etc…

The Divided Self – Laing
Came across this in the library, a riveting read about psychotherapy and more.

A Secure Base – Bowlby
Attachment, parenting and more topics which can come into play during music therapy.

Musicophilia – Sacks
Tales of music and the brain from a neuroscientist, a powerful book written in everyday language.

Flute, Accordion or Clarinet? – Oldfield, Tomlinson, Loombe
Discusses a range of musical instruments and how they can be used in music therapy.

Presenting the Evidence – Ansdell, Pavlicevic, Procter
A practical down-to-earth guide to music therapy research.

How Music Helps – Ansdell
A wide-ranging summary of all kinds of music therapy information, case studies and further details.

Creative Music in Groupwork – Achenbach
Practical guidance for music with groups, from warm-ups to full activities.

Music Therapy with Children and their Families – Oldfield, Flower
Examples from a range of settings, vivid portraits of music therapy with family groups.

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Dementia and music therapy

There are many documented cases where music impacts people with dementia, somehow re-awakening long lost memories.  It appears speech and music are handled by different areas of the brain, and songs learned early in life will be retained when other faculties have gone.  Here are just a few quotes from articles around this subject – and there’s much more to discover!

“I’ve seen many music therapy sessions where people who can’t speak still sing, or respond to a musical cue. The research we carried out in our homes along with Anglia Ruskin University showed music therapy bringing demonstrable wellbeing benefits for people with dementia. There’s even some suggestion that music therapy could reduce the need for medication.” – Ming Hung Hsu, MHA – Stimulating minds with music and memory

“It made me realise that people with dementia had a special ability to remember songs. Even if people with dementia can’t talk, they may be able to sing, whistle, clap or tap their feet. It helps them, and their carers, to feel life is worthwhile.” Quote on Age UK: Dementia and music

“The aim is to use interactive music and music therapy on dementia sufferers in order to help them maintain function, access memory and connect with those around them.” – article on New Zealand Herald

“My Mum’s communication improved around the time music therapy started. When she had had music therapy, she was different. She was lighter, she was engaged, she was doing something in life that she really enjoyed. She was just a different person, because she had had the therapy. She’s not agitated when she’s in therapy.” – Kathryne Cowhig, quoted on MHA Stimulating Minds campaign